– Three previously selected Russian films, which received state funding or were funded by foundations linked to the Russian government, will now not be screened at the German gathering

The balcony movie by Paweł Łozinski

Russian filmmakers Aleksey Junior German, Lyubov Mulmenko and Ekaterina Selenkina withdrew their films – respectively, House arrest [+see also:
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, The Danube and Detours [+see also:
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– of the program of the 22nd edition of the goEast – Central and Eastern European Film Festival, which takes place from April 19 to 25 in Wiesbaden and the Rhine-Main region. As a result, this year’s Competition section will feature only 14 films and the missing titles will not be replaced with any others. In addition, the festival will launch a panel where Ukrainian participants will discuss the boycott of Russian cinema from a Ukrainian perspective and explain their motivations and goals.

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Besides the opening film, Paweł Łozinskithe daring experience of The balcony movie [+see also:
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, the centerpiece of the festival is the Competition section, through which goEast showcases the finest moments of contemporary Central and Eastern European cinema. This program segment includes another Polish co-production, Aga Woszczynskait is silent earth [+see also:
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; one of the Kosovar breakthroughs of the last year, Vera dreams of the sea [+see also:
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by Kaltrina Krasniqi; the hungarian bodybuilding drama Soft [+see also:
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interview: László Csuja and Anna Nemes
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by Laszlo Csuja and Anna Nemes, which began its festival journey competing at Sundance; Armenian poetic documentary 5 dreamers and a horse by Vahagn Khachatrian and Aren Malakyan; Lithuanian crime thriller pilgrims [+see also:
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by Laurynas Bareisa; the bulgarian absurd winter tale January [+see also:
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by Andrei M Paounov; the documentary in defense of civil rights Cotton100% by the Uzbek director Mikhail Borodin; and the drama of the refugees As far as I can walk [+see also:
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by the Serbian director Stefan Arsenijevicwhich won the top prize, the Crystal Globe, at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival last year.

Belarus is represented by two films: the documentary portrait Mara by Sasha Koulak, following a colorful woman through the mass protests against Lukashenko’s dictatorship; and another observational documentary, Where are we going by Ruslan Fedotov, which sees the Moscow Metro as a mirror of Russian society. Three Ukrainian productions or co-productions face off in competition: a documentary portrait of the war, Bone piles by Taras Tomenko; the family drama Klondike [+see also:
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interview: Maryna Er Gorbach
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by Maryna Er Gorbach, also on the front line, in the middle of the war on the Ukrainian-Russian border; and Sergei Loznitsais deeply troubling Bab Yar. The context [+see also:
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. Russia participates in the Yakutian colonial drama nuucha (Russia, 2021) by Vladimir Munkuevset in late 19th century Siberia.

The jury of the goEast competition is chaired by the Serbian actress Jasna Đuricicwhich is accompanied by the Ukrainian producer Natalia LibetGeorgian director Salome JashiPolish journalist, filmmaker and curator Kornel Miglusand Belarusian director Aliaksei Paluyan. The FIPRESCI jury includes Alik Shpilyukartistic director at Ukrainian film academydirector of programs at Odessa Film Festival and vice-president of FIPRESCI Ukraine; Senem Erdine, film critic and curator from Turkey; and Konstanty Kuzmaco-founder and co-editor of Eastern European Cinema BulletinGermany.

The seven films in the Bioscop sidebar offer a panoramic overview of all that contemporary Central and Eastern European cinema has had to offer over the past year, while the traditional goEast symposium entitled ‘Which Way to the East ? Godard, Cinema and Ideology in Central and Eastern Europe” examines themes and trends in Central and Eastern European cinema through the work of Jean-Luc Godard, which attacked the East to an extraordinary degree. The festival also pays tribute to the work of the Georgian filmmaker Lana Gogoberidze by showing ten of her films and organizing a live talk with her. Another exciting retrospective program is the “Thirty Years of Post-Soviet Cinema” lineup, which marks the anniversary of the collapse of the Soviet Union.

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